Planning approved on contemporary home in Cotswold AONB

Cirencester home by coombes everitt 1

Cheltenham-based architects, coombes everitt has secured planning permission for a new low-energy home to be built in the grounds of a former manor house in a Cotswold village near Cirencester.

The single storey residential dwelling design incorporates a green flat roof with Cotswold stone exterior walls, and an overhanging roof to ensure there is no light pollution or glare from the ceiling-to-floor glazing.

We were very conscious of the need to be sensitive to the landscape and environment with our design, and to ensure that the building would have as little visual impact as possible,” explained John Everitt, Director, coombes everitt.

As the manor house land falls within the Cotswold Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) we wanted our design to be thoughtful and sympathetic, while enabling any occupants of the new property to derive maximum enjoyment from the local landscape.

“The floor-to-ceiling triple glazed windows will enable the property to benefit fully from the natural light and the views, while the overhanging roof will reduce any potential ‘light-spill’ or glare,” added John.

Obtaining planning permission in such areas can be quite challenging, and Coombes Everitt worked with planning experts, SF Planning, to ensure the process was a straightforward as possible, with any concerns from the planning officer addressed and mitigated.

Although in this case, the location for the property is on a disused tennis court and as such already regarded as previously developed land suitable for planning permission, it was by no means a done deal,” said Toby Coombes, Director, coombes everitt.

Getting the landscaping elements right and ensuring the new build would not be visible to the existing manor house occupants was critical, and we also worked closely with SF Planning who has lots of experience with these issues.”

The new property will be very well insulated and energy-efficient, but the clients are still considering additional measures such as solar panels and or a ground-sourced heat pump to make the most of renewable energy sources.

Our success in securing planning permission for this new home shows it is possible to develop contemporary dwellings in a sympathetic way on existing residential land, with very little impact on the surroundings,” said John.